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LEARN HOW TO FLOAT FISH FOR ONTARIO STEELHEAD

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Learn how to float fish for Ontario steelhead


 

 

 

Ontario is home to some of the finest steelhead fishing on the planet, and there is no better time to enjoy the action than right now after the fish have completed spawning.

 

And while the Great Lakes, in general, offer superb steelhead opportunities, the true hot spot may just be the entire north shore of Lake Superior and Lake Huron.

 

As celebrated as the fishing is, however, some anglers are cautious about dipping their toes into the water, mistakenly believing that float fishing for rainbows is difficult.

 

"It is easy to get started float fishing with a 10-foot spinning rod and reel," says Thunder Bay's Wes Bender, who manufactures the famous Superior Floats. "It may not be quite as effective as a centerpin setup, but you can certainly get the job done. I know because I did it for years."

 


While Wes Bender enjoys float fishing for steelhead with a centerpin rod and reel, he says newcomers can catch just as many trout with a 10-foot spinning rod and reel. (Photo credit: Wes Bender)

According to Bender the three essentials to pay close attention to are the depth of the water, the speed of the current, and the presence or absence of waves.

 

"You always want to keep your bait down near bottom," says Bender, "and choosing the proper float will help you do it. When the water is deeper than 6 feet, I use a slip float. And if the run is short, I'll increase its size so that I can add more weight to my line to get my bait down quickly."

 

Alternatively, when Bender is fishing a slow moving shallow section of a river, he opts for one of his Lil Trotter or Fixed Loafer style floats that are considerably more streamlined and thus, sink quickly and respond immediately to light biting fish. The Fixed Loafer also rides higher in the water, so if you make a long cast, you can easily watch it drift downstream.

 

He uses the same style floats when he is fishing fast-moving water.

 

"The Trotter is your basic float, whereas the Fixed Loafer is a more custom shape," Bender explains. "Personally, it is my 'go-to' float, the one I find myself using the most. It has gained a large following among some of the more proficient float anglers on the North Shore." ...read more here http://www.northernontario.travel/fishing/learn-to-float-fish-for-fishing-ontario-steelhead-in-lake-superior-and-lake-huron

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IT'S SPRING MIGRATION by Trish Manning

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It's Spring Migration

Prothonotary Warbler

DO YOU KNOW WHERE THE BIRDING HOTSPOTS ARE?

See and learn about the beautiful birds at spring festivals and events.



Don't miss the spring migration in Ontario!

There are several birding hot spots at various Ontario Provincial Parks and National Parks, especially at parks that border the Great Lakes. Crossing Lake Ontario, or any other large body of water, can be a tiring experience. This provides us with a perfect opportunity to catch a glimpse of several bird species as they rest up after a long flight. 

Here are a few best bets to see spring birds:

READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/outdoor-adventures/birding-hot-spots-in-ontario

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GET WRINKLES OUT OF SOUL by Joanie McGuffin

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Get Wrinkles Out of Your Soul 

A Grey Owl Paddling Adventure

 
7 day lodge and camping package with Smoothwater Outfitters & Ecolodge
Packages: 
From $705
 BOOK NOW

PADDLE IN ONE OF THE PLANET'S MOST BEAUTIFUL PLACES

Lose yourself in the ancient beauty of Temagami where the trees are so large it takes two people to hug them.



Temagami, also known as Grey Owl Country, boasts a vast system of canoe routes.

One particular favourite of ours is the three-day adventure through the Wakimika Triangle. It is one of the planet's most beautiful places. Rock ridges and cliffs, majestic white pine, clear-water swimming, and gorgeous sunset campsites. Evidence of the age and permanence of the land and the people is everywhere. Millions of years held in rocks and stories and trees.

This canoe route lying north of Lake Temagami connects three lakes; Diamond, Wakimika and Obabika. It includes the easy, winding Wakimika River and a couple of portages. A fly-in adventure is worth the price affording you the most impressive views.

There's a part day's adventure to a very special pictograph site, Diamond Lake's North Arm. Paddle in to the white rock wall with its clear-to-see lines, circles and arrows. These symbols are found on many rock art canvases throughout the region.

Following the shoreline south and west we explore islands, pick blueberries and swim in the warm waters.

Temagami Fly In Adventure 2664

Two portages lead to Wakimika Lake, the first one being a bit rugged. The trick to enjoying them is to take your time, pack well and use the right equipment.

READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/outdoor-adventures/explore-temagami-s-ancient-beauty

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10 SPOTS TO DISCOVER THE FRENCH RIVER

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10 Spots to Discover the French River

SOME OF CANADA’S MOST FAMOUS ADVENTURERS EXPLORED THIS RIVER. SO CAN YOU.



The French River area of Northeastern Ontario has long been a favourite among outdoor enthusiasts keen on fishing, paddling, backcountry camping, and just plain relaxing, but its rich history goes back centuries. Long before explorers such as Étienne Brûlé and Samuel de Champlain, and long before the fur-trading voyageurs paddled the French, the river was a natural waterway for the area’s Indigenous peoples as it flowed westward from Lake Nipissing to Georgian Bay.

Five Finger Rapids, French River.

The French River became a vital route for the logging industry in the late 1800s, as logs were floated down to saw mills located near the river’s mouth on Georgian Bay. Its historical significance as a transportation corridor led to the French River’s designation in 1986 as Canada’s first Heritage River. The French River Provincial Park protects this historic waterway.


The French River Visitor Centre Interior.

The French River Visitor Centre, located where Hwy 69 crosses the river, features an exhibit that takes you back in time. “Voices of the River” showcases the history, geology, and ecology of the area. The Centre received the Governor General’s Medal in Architecture in 2010 for uniting nature and construction in a building that merges with the original landscape.

READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/northeastern-ontario/canada-150-discovering-the-french-river

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WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A FISHING KAYAK by Andrew Austin

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What to Look for in a Fishing Kayak 

A FEW TIPS FOR FISHING SMALL, INLAND WATERS



Did you know that the oldest known fishing hook dates back to 40,000 BC? We’ve come a long way since then and today, fishing is more than a tool for survival – especially in Northeastern Ontario. If you’re planning a fishing trip, I’d like to tell you why you should give kayak fishing a try at least once.

It’s a hobby, a relaxing pastime, and can be a great adventure sport. Kayak fishing encourages a healthy lifestyle! It’s a chance to get close to Mother Nature and experience the great outdoors. Fishing is fun regardless of your gender and culture. 

WHY KAYAK FISHING?

More and more people are tending towards traditional kayak fishing. If you’re a fisherman by profession, motorboats can save you time; but if you do it for fun and are going to fish in small inland waters like lakes, rivers, watercourses, inlets, and bays, you should really give kayak fishing a chance.

  • Kayaks move quicker: With no sound of motor or paddles slicing through the water, you’ll easily find fish before they scare from noise      
  • Allow better access: Kayaks can take you anywhere you want to go for fishing. They allow easy access, whether it’s a narrow bay or a stream loaded with fish that boaters can’t reach
  • Kayaks are economical: No gas! Almost no upkeep! No repair! No oil! No storage overhead! No boat registration! No insurance! It’s a one-time fee and maintenance fees are low. Another popular option is renting a kayak and practicing with it before committing to purchasing your own (scroll down for a list of operators).
  • Convenient: If you own a hard shell kayak, hang it on your garage’s wall. If you have an inflatable kayak, just release the air and fold it into your trunk or vehicle to transport it anywhere.
  • Calorie Burner: Kayak fishing is great exercise. Fishing = Fun + Fitness! What’s better than that?
  • READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/northeastern-ontario/what-to-look-for-in-a-fishing-kayak
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BACKCOUNTRY PADDLING & HIKING IN ONTARIO PARKS by Trish Manning

Backcountry-Main-

Backcountry Paddling and Hiking in Ontario Parks 

#PADDLEON

Start planning your backcountry adventure today!



Explore the wild lands and waters of Ontario Parks’ backcountry with an unparalleled paddling or hiking adventure. Whether you are an avid adventurer or new to backcountry tripping, Ontario Parks has the experience you are looking for.

Backcountry travel requires some specialized skills and safety is of the utmost importance. Park staff and local outffitters/adventure companies offer exceptional planning and outfitting services for guided or unguided trips.

If you don't want to camp for all or any of your backcountry adventure, you can stay in rustic comfort at unique lodges or cabins and do day paddling or hiking trips.

To find out more about services for each park, click on the Park name below.

READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/outdoor-adventures/backcountry-paddling-and-hiking-adventures-in-ontario-parks

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ONTARIO'S ATV TRAILS by Mike Jacobs

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Ontario's ATV Trails

THE COMPLETE GUIDE



With thousands of kilometres of trails, and more being added each year, it's no wonder Ontario is renowned as an ATV playground. Whether you're riding a Utility, Sport or Side by Side ATV, looking for a scenic getaway for the family or a challenging new spot to test your skills, Ontario has a trail for you.

Each trail and municipality has its own rules and regulations, so always follow the Golden Rule: "Know Before You Go." Check with the local club to see what permits you need and make sure you're familiar with the local by-laws regarding ATV's on roads and crown land. Don't trespass, stay on the trails, ride safe, and have fun!

READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/atving/atv-trails-in-ontario

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OPEN THE WALLEYE SEASON LIKE A PRO by Gord Pyzer

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Open the Walleye Season Like a Pro

Mathew Koprash's opening day walleye staple is a 1/8- to 1/4-ounce chartreuse coloured ball head jig that he tips it with a nightcrawler.

USE THESE TIPS TO FISH BIG ONTARIO WALLEYE DURING MAY OPENING WEEKEND



If you're a walleye angler who loves to fish in Ontario, you know what is going to happen over the next three weekends.

It's the opening of the walleye season on the first Saturday of the month in southern Ontario, the second Saturday in the central part of the province and the third Saturday across all of massive Northern Ontario.

It's like rolling Christmas and your birthday into one great big party.

"I'll be opening the 2017 walleye season this weekend on the Bay of Quinte," says top Ontario guide, Nicholas Werner, "I'll walk out my back door and hit the throttle on my new Kingfisher 2025 HHT and run right toward Lady O (Lake Ontario)."


With the warm weather we've enjoyed this spring, walleye guide Nicholas Werner anticipates finding the fish in their post-spawn transition stage. (Photo credit: Gord Pyzer)

Northeastern Ontario walleye stick, Mathew Koprash won't be going far either, kicking off the season on his beloved Lake Nipissing.

"There is no other lake I would rather target on opening weekend," says Koprash. "And I'll come home with a big smile and a sore arm."

While Werner and Koprash are separated by several hundred kilometres, they both anticipate that with the unseasonably warm weather we've experienced this spring, they will find the walleyes in the throes of the post-spawn transition.


North Bay walleye ace, Mathew Koprash will be opening the walleye season on Lake Nipissing, where he says when you find the bait, you find the fish. (Photo credit: Gord Pyzer)

"I am expecting the fish to be transitioning from the shallow spawning bays and inlets back out to the main lake basin," says Koprash. "They'll be focusing on restoring their energy levels and we may even get lucky and find them following the shiners into the shallows. If this is the case, when you find the bait, you will find the walleyes."

Werner agrees.

"With the warm weather," he says, "I'll have the Kingfisher loaded down with just about everything I own. I'll rely first on my Cabela's trolling rods rigged with the Quinte regulars, including specially painted clown and perch coloured Rapala Husky Jerks from Big Eye Custom Tackle, Berkley Flicker Minnows and Reef Runners. I won't hit the "meat street", (Werner's term for the classic walleye worm harness) until the water temperature hits around 53° F to 55° F.


With the warm weather we've enjoyed this spring, walleye guide Nicholas Werner anticipates finding the fish in their post-spawn transition stage. (Photo credit: Gord Pyzer)

Koprash, too, anticipates loading up his boat with walleye gear so that no potential opportunity goes untapped.

"Having bass fishing in my blood has me rigged up with all the options," Koprash chuckles, "but my tried and true Lake Nipissing staple is a 1/8- to 1/4-ounce chartreuse coloured ball head jig. I'll tip it with a worm and if the walleyes are biting tentatively, I'll add a stinger hook."

I should mention, too, that Koprash always keeps another ace up his sleeve -- a drift sock.

READ ON CLICK HERE : http://www.northernontario.travel/fishing/open-the-walleye-season-like-a-pro

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SEE WHAT QUEBEC HAS TO OFFER FOR THE OUTDOOR LIFE

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Hunting and fishing

For Québecers, blessed with abundant wildlife, hunting and fishing are more than just sports: they’re a unique opportunity to get back to basics. Outfitters offer accommodations, equipment, guides and other logistical support—in a word, all the amenities needed to facilitate encounters with the large cervids, black bears, wildfowl, small game and fish that inhabit this vast wilderness.

- See more at: https://www.quebecoriginal.com/en-ca/see-and-do/hunting-fishing#sthash.zJ5nUS6p.dpuf

https://www.quebecoriginal.com/en-ca/see-and-do/hunting-fishing

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10 SPOTS TO DISCOVER THE FRENCH

10 Spots to Discover the French River

SOME OF CANADA’S MOST FAMOUS ADVENTURERS EXPLORED THIS RIVER. SO CAN YOU.



The French River area of Northeastern Ontario has long been a favourite among outdoor enthusiasts keen on fishing, paddling, backcountry camping, and just plain relaxing, but its rich history goes back centuries. Long before explorers such as Étienne Brûlé and Samuel de Champlain, and long before the fur-trading voyageurs paddled the French, the river was a natural waterway for the area’s Indigenous peoples as it flowed westward from Lake Nipissing to Georgian Bay.

Five Finger Rapids, French River.

The French River became a vital route for the logging industry in the late 1800s, as logs were floated down to saw mills located near the river’s mouth on Georgian Bay. Its historical significance as a transportation corridor led to the French River’s designation in 1986 as Canada’s first Heritage River. The French River Provincial Park protects this historic waterway.


The French River Visitor Centre Interior.

The French River Visitor Centre, located where Hwy 69 crosses the river, features an exhibit that takes you back in time. “Voices of the River” showcases the history, geology, and ecology of the area. The Centre received the Governor General’s Medal in Architecture in 2010 for uniting nature and construction in a building that merges with the original landscape.

The French River Snowmobile Bridge.

You will find another unique construction just a short walk from the Visitor Centre. The snowmobile suspension bridge that spans the French River gorge is the largest of its kind in the world, connecting a network of trails for snowmobile enthusiasts.

FRENCH RIVER TRADING POST

Founded by Bill Biggs and his parents in 1956, the French River Trading Post has grown from a small shop on a gravel road to a booming business complete with gift shop, restaurant, and—of course—the Hungry Bear! Now owned and operated by Bill Biggs’ wife Diane and daughter Tracey, the French River Trading Post is known for its souvenirs that include Canadian-made moccasins, local handicrafts, and its famous cream and butter fudge. Along with its regular menu, the Hungry Bear Restaurant features your choice of 16 different flavours of ice cream at the Ice Dream Den.

If there’s one thing that the French River is known for—beside its history—is its fishing. The French River is home to many lodges and tourist operators that offer a variety of fishing as well as other outdoor experiences to make your BIG Northeastern Ontario vacation dreams a reality.

CRANE’S LOCHAVEN WILDERNESS LODGE

Located on a private island on the French River, Crane’s Lochaven Wilderness Lodge is an American Plan fishing lodge that has been family-owned and operated since 1973. Your hosts Sue and Ed Crane and their staff offer outstanding hospitality and top-notch service in a wilderness setting that is nothing short of awe-inspiring. You’ll soon realize why fishing on the French at Crane’s Lochaven Wilderness Lodge is one of the most memorable experiences you’ll ever have. Just ask their guests who keep coming back year after year.

TOTEM POINT LODGE

Family-owned since 1972, Totem Point Lodge on Wolesley Bay is a beautiful drive-in lodge that offers both Housekeeping and full American Plan packages. Totem Point Lodge caters to anglers and their families, with guests coming from as far away as China and for as long as 56 consecutive years. It must be the fishing that keeps them coming back—fishing for Walleye, Northern Pike, Muskellunge, Smallmouth Bass, and Largemouth Bass. The prize for the annual Fishing Contest is a week’s free accommodation the following year.

read on click here: http://www.northernontario.travel/northeastern-ontario/canada-150-discovering-the-french-river

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10 SWEET SPOTS FOR ONTARIO BROOK TROUT

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ONTARIO CAN LAY CLAIM TO BEING THE WORLD'S BEST BROOK TROUT DESTINATION

Having the world record on the resume doesn't hurt. Let's go for a little tour of Ontario's world class brookie hotspots.


 

 

Nipigon System

On July 21, 1915, the world record brook trout was caught in the Nipigon River. Today, people still travel to the region to try and break that record. Lake Nipigon, the headwater of the Nipigon River, remains a remarkably unspoiled place. Some anglers camp and fish around the large islands like Shakespeare and Kelvin. The Nipigon River is broken up by three hydro electric dam, and each section has brook trout. Below Alexander's dam, the river runs free to Lake Superior. There is much good brook trout water in this section.

 

Lake Superior

Lake Superior has long been a famous destination for brook trout anglers from all over the world. The lake's "coaster brook trout" grow large and provide great sport. Most coaster fishing is centered around Nipigon Bay and the surrounding out islands. Several hotspots east of Nipigon Bay include Terrace Bay, Rossport, Marathon and Pukaskwa Park. West of Nipigon, there are coasters found in Black Bay, Bays End of Thunder Bay, and Pine Bay near the border.

 

The Winisk River

Winisk River is born at Winisk Lake, and runs some 700 km north into Hudson Bay. For the trout angler, gorgeous speckled trout up to 6 pounds lurk in the white water rapids found throughout the river. You need a good guide here, but the trip is spectacular.

 

brook trout(Photo credit: Gord Ellis)

Algonquin Park

Algonquin Park has better than 1,500 lakes and is home to some very famous brook trout water. Lakes in the remote sections of the park are difficult to access so receive little pressure. There are some truly giant brookies available for those who aren't afraid to lug a canoe and swat a few blackflies.

 

Wawa/Lake Superior Provincial Park

So many lakes, so little time. There are literally dozens of stocked and native brook trout lakes throughout this area. Some of the more remote spots provide world class brook trout opportunities. Again, the deeper you get back into the park, the better the opportunities.

 

Sutton River

The most remote spot on this list, but maybe the only place on earth you can catch dozens of 4-pound brook trout in one day. On a dry fly. A bucket list trip that every trout angler should do. Several outfitters service this area.

Read more...http://www.northernontario.travel/fishing/ten-sweet-spots-for-ontario-brook-trout

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JERKIN' JAWS - JERKBAIT TACTICS CATCH EVERYTHING THAT SWIMS! by James Linder

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Jerkin’ Jaws - Jerkbait Tactics Catch Everything That Swims!

Jerkin' Jaws - How to Catch Big Fish with a Crankbait


Editors Note: James Lindner is a member of the United States Fishing Hall of Fame and son of In-Fisherman co-founder Ron Lindner. Starting out as a guide, James quickly became a key part of the family business. Now a regular host on Lindner's Angling Edge, James continues to teach the techniques of fishing to thousands of anglers and his commitment to education in fishing is unparalleled. In this exclusive article for NorthernOntario.travel, James gives you the low down on jerk baits and how to use them to catch more and bigger fish in Northwest Ontario.

Visitors to Northwest Ontario often target their favorite fish, matching their tactics to each species' haunts and habits. Pike and muskie anglers usually toss big baits around weeds and rocks. Walleye anglers tend to vertically fish jigs or livebait rigs along drop-offs to deep water. In summer, lake trout anglers troll extreme depths with spoons, while brook trout specialists cast small spinners and minnowbaits into the shallows. Historically, these proven patterns work, year in and year out, and it's hard to argue with success.

On the other hand...many folks don't discriminate. They simply want to get bit, and to tangle with something big and powerful pulling on the end of their line. Wouldn't it be nice if you could use one lure and method, just about everywhere, to catch everything that swims? And never know in advance which species of fish might bite on your next cast? That's the kind of anticipation and thrill that makes fishing Northwest Ontario waters so spectacular. Particularly when the system is so easy that anyone can employ and enjoy it with great success.

The Jerk

In the old days, the term "jerkbait" meant large, heavy chunks of wood sprouting multiple oversized treble hooks. They were almost exclusively flung for muskies, although other species wrapped their jaws around their magnum profiles. Still do, in fact.

In modern parlance, the term "jerkbait" arises out of the bass market. It applies to long, thin minnow imitators that resemble Rapala's Original Minnow, a classic fish-catching profile that's been tearing up the fishing world for 50 years and more. But rather than incorporating a subtle, wiggling, high-flotation body, jerkbaits are instead molded from durable plastic, and internally weighted to be not too heavy, not too light, but just right. Their precisely-balanced design makes jerkbaits neutrally buoyant, meaning that when you pause your retrieve or stop pulling them through the water, they neither float back toward the surface, nor sink toward the bottom. They suspend in place, totally vulnerable before a fish's eyes, just begging to get whacked. This "hanging in suspense" characteristic totally infuriates following or hesitant fish into striking.

READ ON CLICK HERE : http://www.northernontario.travel/sunset-country/jerkinjaws

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THE TRENT SEVERN WATERWAY THE HARD WAY by Oliver Solaro

THE TRENT SEVERN WATERWAY THE HARD WAY by Oliver Solaro

The Trent Severn Waterway the Hard Way

#BROKENTOOTHCHAMPLAIN

ADV daredevil Oliver "Brokentooth" Solaro manages to turn the usually tranquil cruise up the Trent Severn lock system into a harrowing struggle for survival. It's just the beginning of his attempt to retrace the Samuel de Champlain route on a bike strapped to a raft...



Is this how CHamplain did it?

By this point I'd given up trying to puke over the side. The boiling waves were enough to wash the vomit from my feet, two crashing crests at a time. My trembling lips curled into a pale green smile at the decision to have had canned ravioli instead of trail mix for lunch. 

What was now painfully obvious about my plan to follow the route of 17th-century explorer Samuel de Champlain is that I started too late. This smack in the chops occurred as I dropped my wallet on the floor in front of a dozen or so strangers at the Trenton Canadian Tire, whilst purchasing what can only really be described as a one-and-a-half-pound Barbie anchor. Underestimation number four of 383. Summer was now on the wane, yet my contraption of tubes, tires and the 14-foot inflatable bananas I'd hope would see me float thousands of kilometres had yet to see water. Truth be told, I had no idea at this point if it would even float. 

None of this personal turmoil and trepidation was of consequence to the customers shifting back and forth on their heels staring, while at the same time trying hard to avoid eye contact with the red-caped, kilt-wearing, white cavalier-feathered "musketeer" in motocross boots. 

Day 2 saw the sun pierce haphazard rays through the red morning clouds, hinting a "sailor take warning" note. Today would see the Jolly Codger (as I've named the "boat") and I metaphorically and physically taste the tea-green waters of the Trent-Severn Waterway system. Today would be the first bit of forward motion on a project unlike anything I've conjured to date. Today would be the first of many tests of my sphincter's clamp force capability. Today was the day.

Sink or Swim

Tim from nearby CFB Trenton graciously came to help bolt, strap, tie, heave, and otherwise grunt the Codger into something vaguely resembling a seaworthy craft. Morning morphed into late afternoon, and the Codger was still drier than a Nevada summer as more good folks, friends and others, arrived to help.

READ ON CLICK HERE: http://www.northernontario.travel/boating/brokentooth-takes-on-the-trent-severn-waterway-by-boat-and-motorcycle

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